Pensacola, Florida Naval Air Station

We had only one day to explore Pensacola NAS and we did the best we could.  It has so 

much to offer.  We toured the NAS Museum first and it was impressive. That took us most of the morning and into lunchtime because we also chose a movie presentation on the Magic of Flight.  There were large numbers of children present, but not a peep out of them; they were mesmerized and glued to their movie seats.

The displays start with early flight machines and progress through time covering many years and eras of war and peace.

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There were so many that we couldn’t take enough photographs, but we tried.  Phil really liked this plane as the first book he ever read was about this plane. The RAF called this the Spit Fire.

_DSC0170reduced_1636 They had several “hands on” exhibits for big and little kids.

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This display reminded me of my grandmother’s kitchen when I was a little girl.

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I think that I remember the stroller being passed around for several generations!

But the most thrilling of all was the practice run of the Blue Angels.  It was significant to see the five jets back in the air.  They lost a plane and pilot not long ago and the area was so sad about it.  It was healing for them to see the four jets going through loops and turns while the fifth jet did solo flights and then joined them from time to time.

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I had not seen the Blue Angels in action, so it was a treat for me.  I am seeing so many firsts since we came on the road fulltime. Phil did a great job of photographing the day.

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Fortunately, we were on the hilltop of Fort Barrancas when the Blue Angels took to the sky.  It gave us front row seats in the grass to watch the grand performance and give Phil a good spot for pictures.

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Fort Barrancas was originally built by the Spanish and has centuries of history being under the rule of Spain, France, Britain, Spain again, before the Americans gained control under the sale of Florida by Spain in 1839.

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The upper and lower batteries are connected by tunnels and passageways throughout the fort.  The windows in each section all along the passageway were firing portals to protect the fort at almost any angle. This is the only thing this and the other passageways were used for.

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There were crooks and crannies everywhere.  We definitely got our steps in that day!

Last stop was the Pensacola Light House.  It is built on a beautiful coast and some say it is haunted.  We didn’t climb the many steps upward to find out.

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